Make Work Fun!

Olympic rings
Tradition can be Fun.

As I slowly took my seat to watch the reenactment of Olympia in a grand manner, as always, I “oohed” and “aahed” on several occasions at the magnificent and terrific way the host country had developed their narrative, infusing every element of their cultural popularity and character into the opening of the games. I comfortably and attentively watched every movement, speech, symbol and mannerism.

Then it hit me! Tradition is not as evil as I thought it was. Tradition is cool. It can be, as a matter of fact, a very awesome process and experience.

The Olympics has been around long before I was born into this world, 776 BCE according to records in Olympia.

Although repeated every four years, participants and spectators find The Olympics intriguing as the world stands at attention, preparing for it, watching and waiting energetically. Yes, the world stands up for the tradition of Olympics.

So, I continued watching the opening ceremony and the most traditional moment came, with David Beckham bearing the Olympic Torch which I like to call “Olympia’s torch” and something about that moment struck me headlong. I fell in love with tradition and the recycling phase of doing something over and over, which is quite contrary to how I define myself. I thought to myself “why can’t we take monotonous, mind-numbing everyday activities and recycle them for fun?” Work can sometimes be mundane, tiresome and traditional but we can seek out fun in it, make it momentous, and recycle it for good.

This year the cauldron was lit by a group of young athletes, instead of the usual big star lighting of the Cauldron.  And as Micheal Moraitis put it, the young athletes “made lemonade with lemons”.

Work may be boring, traditional, dreary, perhaps frustrating; but you can get more out of it if you fire it up, game it and make it significant. Tradition is fun, if you put up your opening ceremony, carve out beautiful moments and recycle the fun- you’ve finally become the host of the show.

WRITTEN BY
Nathan Jeffery
Notification Bell