Do You Remember Your First Job? Hakkunde Movie Cast Speak

Hakkunde Movie Cast Share Their First Job Experiences

Your first job experience is probably not just memorable because it was your first, but partly because it was also not as easy as you had imagined it would be.

We had a chat with the Producer and Director of the movie, Hakkunde, Asurf Oluseyi and the movie’s screenwriter, Tomiwa Adesina who is also a fiction series blogger and filmmaker and they shared their stories.

In two separate interviews, both Oluseyi and Adesina tell their interesting yet surprising details about how they got their first jobs, their impact on their first job in their career as well as their emotional experiences while working on the set of the Hakkunde movie.

See excerpts below:

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Interview With Asurf Oluseyi – Producer/Director of Hakkunde Movie

Asurf Oluseyi - Hakkunde movie and first job experience

How and when did you get your first job?

I got my first job in 2005 as a cyber cafe supervisor. I saw an advert posted on a random wall on the wall and I applied, although I had very little on computers. All I knew back then was open a new email address. However, I had confidence in myself and had nothing to lose. I just knew I could learn everything I needed to know on the internet if I got the job, which I eventually did. Another thing I had at the back of my mind was the knowledge that my boss would not be too harsh when I resumed.

Tell us one thing that you can never forget about your first job?

My first job opened my mind to thousands of resources online. I worked in the first ever cyber cafe in my community in Ipaja. For the first time in my life, everything seemed possible. In fact, I applied to hundreds of universities abroad and I amazed by the invitation letters I was getting from universities in the USA despite the fact that I didn’t have an international passport. A lot of things began to look possible with my access to the internet.

How did your first job prepare you for the rest of your career?

With free access to the internet in my office, everything looked possible. I got my first camera in 2006 but it was not because I wanted to be a cinematographer or director. I wasn’t even planning to take up filmmaking as a career. A friend was selling a camcorder cheaply and I bought it. After a few weeks, I realised the camera was just sitting in my wardrobe, so I challenged myself to make it useful by learning how to operate it. The process was fun and all of a sudden, I switched from playing CRT and Mario to playing with my new toy ‘the camera’ and exploring tutorials online on photography and editing. I never thought I could make a living out of this new game. It was just fun back then.

Is there any part of the Hakkunde movie that reminded you of your first job?

Yes! Exploring knowledge and information online. Akande (The character in Hakkunde) also, at some point in his journey to discovery, had to use my lecturer ‘Mr Google’ and I could connect his struggle to my first days at work.

What was the most emotional part of the Hakkunde movie for you?

I’ll say the whole process of making this film; from development to risking all my resources on this film, to shooting in the North where most filmmakers would avoid and experiencing the amazing Fulanis and changing the narratives about the Northern part of Nigeria.

Also, it is my first feature and one of my lead actors, Late Mrs Bukky Ajayi (mama Akande) died a few weeks to the principal photography. I was broken and I told my crew that we won’t replace her. Luckily for us, we already had some shots of her and we had to swing it and re-develop the story. Mama was the first act of the film and she was very passionate about Akande’s story as it’s characterized by actions and reactions that define the everyday Nigerian society. I considered replacing her disrespectful, but we did justice to her performance as she was relevant in Akande’s journey and I think everyone should watch out for it.

What is one advice you have for Job Seekers experiencing difficulties in getting jobs?

Don’t give up on yourself, and don’t look down on any offer or opportunity. The right job might not come at first, but the first job might prepare you for the right job.

Interview With Tomiwa Adesina – Screenwriter, Fiction Series Blogger and Filmmaker

Tomiwa Adesina - Hakkunde movie and first job experience

How and when did you get your first job?

I got my first job as a screenwriter via social media (Twitter) in 2013. I had been blogging for about a year at the time, and I still am, but I took a shot at it by speaking with a filmmaker who at the time gave me the opportunity and a link to another filmmaker for my first gig. That was the beginning of my journey to screenwriting.

Tell us one thing that you can never forget about your first job?

The highs and lows. When you are new to something, you are excited but also scared. It’s like diving into a pool for the first time; you want it but you are not sure if you are going to sink. There were the days of writing screenplays that weren’t so great because learning the ropes come with its moments but as long as I wanted it, I had to stick to it.

How did your first job prepare you for the rest of your career?

All the experiences I had encountered in my first job were instrumental in helping me grow. This is inclusive of the highs and the lows because you have the opportunity to make mistakes and learn from your mistakes as you forge ahead in your career and of course, when you have the little victories, learning to celebrate them has helped me to appreciate all moments.

Is there any part of the Hakkunde movie that reminded you of your first job?

I could particularly relate to ‘Akande’s disappointment.’ He had been looking for a job for a while and when the opportunity to make some money came in another city, it went in a flash so he had his back against the wall and this is a situation that many people can relate to. The beauty in disappointment is that it offers you a chance to test your character and since I had been at crossroads before, knowing what next to do is instrumental just like Akande in a similar situation.

What was the most emotional part of the Hakkunde movie for you?

As a young writer, I was super thrilled to learn that the late Bukky Ajayi would be in the movie because it was going to be a big honour for me, but then, about a week or two to the principal photography, she passed. It was sad for me and I wouldn’t even be able to explain how hard it must have been on others who were really close to her. The screenplay at this stage was done and submitted so, the Director and I had to re-evaluate the script and how we could still honour Mama Bukky Ajayi in the film regardless of her demise.

What is one advice you have for Job Seekers experiencing difficulties in getting jobs?

Seek personal development. Grow in your interests.

Can you tell us one thing you remember about your first job?

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